7 August 2012

Buying Electrical Toys Abroad

So, you've just bought that fancy new rechargeable vibrator or prostate massager from abroad, only to realise that it comes with a foreign plug. What do you do now, fork out more money on a replacement plug, buy a travel adaptor? Well you needn't fret, and here's why:

Chances are that if you live in the UK you'll have inside your bathroom the humble shaver socket, but what does this have to do with sex toys exactly? Well, you've probably noticed that the plugs on shavers, electric toothbrushes, etc, are different to standard plugs. In fact these rounded two-prong plugs are the same as the ones used all across Europe, so voilĂ , you already have somewhere in the house to plug in a European plug. The second thing to note is that the shape of the holes in the shaver socket aren't completely round, they're like an arch with a notch at the bottom. This notch is important because it also allows a standard flat two-prong North American plug to fit into it. Some shaver sockets even have additional notches cut out around them to accommodate a wider variety of foreign plugs, including the Japanese. So there we go, this whole time you've unknowingly had somewhere in your house where you can plug in and charge your foreign gadgets, with no need to buy extra equipment!

One final thing to note, most of these products will have a transformer on the plug, you should check the voltage range printed on it before plugging it in. Typically it will say something such as 110v-240v, meaning you can use either side of the shaver socket. Remember to always exercise common sense and caution; if you're not certain that it's safe to plug something in then don't do it. This author accepts no responsibility for any damage to property or person as a result of the information provided in this post.

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